Sri Digambar jain Lal Mandir

Sri Digambar jain Lal Mandir

Sri Digambar jain Lal Mandir is located opposite Red Fort, Old Delhi It was built n 1658 A.D. The temple is dedicated to the 23rd Tirthankara, Parashvanath.

The temple houses a Birds Charity Hospital. Sri Digambara Jain Lal Mandir is one of the Delhi’s oldest temple dates back to the time of Mugal emperor Aurangzeb’s reign. It is situated right opposite the Red Fort, at the entrance of the main road. In the adjoining lies the noisy and chaotic main street of Chandni Chowk.

The Architecture of the temple boast detailed carvings, and decorative paintwork in the ante-chambers that surrounding the main shrine to the Parshvanath, the twenty-third Tirthankara.

 

 

Jain Temple in Kumbhalgarh

Jain Temple in the Fortress of Kumbhalgarh: 1829

Jain Temple in the Fortress of Kumbhalgarh: 1829

 

Engraving of a Jain Temple in Kumbhalgarh, by Edwaed Fracis Finden (1791-1857) and Patrick Young Waugh (1788-1829) plate 15 from James Tod’s:”Annals and antiquities of Rajast’han or the Central and Western Rajpoot States of India” published in London in 1829. In 1818 Mewar and other Princely states of Northern India signed a treaty with the British

, and Colonel James Tod became the first Political Agent to the Western Rajput State. Along with his official duties, Tod became very interested in the genealogies of Rajput Kingdoms as well as the art and architecture they produced. The spectacular Rajput hill from Kumbhalgarh is perched on top of the Aravalli Hills and reaches a hight of over 3000 feet. Built in the 15th century by Maharana Kumbha (1419-1463), the complex extends over 12km and includes many palaces and gardens. The fort has seven majestic gates and seven ramparts that are reinforced by rounded bastions and huge watchtowers. Inside the periphery wall there are over 360 temples, a large number of these being Jain and similar to the one depicted here.Of this temple, Tod wrote:” The design of this temple is truly classic. It consists only of the sanctuary, which has a vaulted dome and colonnade portico all around. The Brahmanical as their religion…. The proportion and forms of the columns are especially distinct from the other temples, being slight and tapering instead of massive, the general characteristic of Hindu architecture…”
- Source: British Library